Whistleblower speaks out about cause of crash that killed 8 special operations Airmen 

Whistleblower speaks out about cause of crash that killed 8 special operations Airmen  Whistleblower speaks out about cause of crash that killed 8 special operations Airmen 

FeaturedWIB air February 9, 2024

Update: A Pentagon official has stated the cause of the Osprey aircraft crash in Japan that took the lives of eight service members has... Whistleblower speaks out about cause of crash that killed 8 special operations Airmen 

Update: A Pentagon official has stated the cause of the Osprey aircraft crash in Japan that took the lives of eight service members has been determined.

The official stated the cause was a mechanical failure but declined to say what the failure was, according to the Associated Press.

The official was not authorized to discuss the investigation publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

The official Air Force investigation into why Air Force Special Operations Command CV-22 crash occurred on Nov. 29 is still underway.

The crash led to the grounding of 400 Osprey aircraft across the Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps.

Navy Rear Adm. Chris Engdahl, chairman of the council and commander of Naval Safety Command said the Pentagon’s Joint Safety Council is now working with the three services on their plans to get Osprey crews ready to fly again.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon believes it has identified the mechanical failure that led to a fatal crash of an Osprey aircraft in Japan and the grounding of the fleet for two months, a U.S. defense official told The Associated Press. It is now weighing how the aircraft can be returned to service.

Jon Herskovitz, Bloomberg News

Jan. 11, 2024 – The U.S. and Japan finished a search, rescue and salvage operation for an Osprey military aircraft and its eight airmen who died when it crashed off a Japanese island, prompting the Pentagon to ground its fleet of the tilt-rotor planes.

The search that lasted more than 40 days for the aircraft that went down off of Japan’s southwest island of Yakushima on Nov. 29 involved more than 1,000 personnel, 46 aircraft and unmanned underwater systems, U.S. Air Force Special Operations Command said in a statement Friday.

Bodies of seven of the eight airman on board were recovered along with the majority of the aircraft. “Our thoughts remain with the families and squadron mates of our CV-22 aircrew and we extend our sincerest gratitude to every asset who assisted in the search,” Rear Admiral Jeromy Williams, commander of Special Operations Command Pacific, said in the statement.

An investigation of the incident is still underway, but the U.S. Department of Defense grounded its fleet of several hundred of the planes in December to look into a possible equipment problem for the plane, which has been involved in several deadly crashes.

The plane has two propeller engines on its wings that can be tilted to make it fly like a helicopter, so it can land in tight spaces. The aircraft is made by a unit of Boeing Co. and the Bell Helicopter unit of Textron Inc.

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