Someone slipped a water gun into Army’s pistol competition photos to imply its a joke

Someone slipped a water gun into Army’s pistol competition photos to imply its a joke Someone slipped a water gun into Army’s pistol competition photos to imply its a joke
The way the US military procures things can be curious at times, particularly when it involves weapons. At the Rock Island Arsenal Museum, the... Someone slipped a water gun into Army’s pistol competition photos to imply its a joke

The way the US military procures things can be curious at times, particularly when it involves weapons.

At the Rock Island Arsenal Museum, the sentiments behind this strange process are amusingly clear- in the form of a squirt gun shaped like a hot dog.

An artifact of the doomed XM-10 competition that the US Army set up in order to justify the purchase of the much-maligned Beretta M9, hot dog squirt gun features the words “XM10” scrawled on the side.

Alongside the hot dog gun in the XM-10 display is the Beretta M9, the Smith & Wesson 459 and the Ruger P85. While the latter two firearms did not win military contracts, they were picked up by several law enforcement agencies in the US, serving until the majority were replaced by Glock handguns.

According to The Drive, it is widely believed that the US Army had made up its mind well before the end of the XM-9 program that preceded the XM-10 program. Paired up against several superb (and arguably better-made) firearms such as the Sig Sauer P226 and Walther P88, the Beretta was a darling of US military acquisition and was chosen, narrowly beating the P226.

After a two-year skirmish with the Government Accountability Office, the Army initiated the XM-10 trial, which was largely a farce to justify the purchase of the Berettas.

While Sig Sauer refused to participate, they didn’t walk away empty handed: a “navalized” variant of the P226 (known as the MK25) found its way into Navy Special Warfare arsenals, and a compact variant (known as the M11) became a staple for military police investigators, military intelligence personnel and pilots. Ultimately, SIG would have the last laugh in the form of the M17, which has since begun replacing the Beretta M9s.

Despite being the winner, Beretta ultimately became the biggest loser in the 20th Century race to replace the near-obsolete 1911, which has all but vanished from US military stockpiles outside of a few customized models that remain in special operations units for reasons more related to ego than practicality.

In their race to be the top-dog, Beretta’s M9 suffered from teething issues, including some catastrophic failures that resulted in servicemembers being injured. By the time the M9 was sunsetting in 2017, it had become something of a bad joke among military personnel- a heavy, oversized pistol that nobody was particularly fond of, with a trigger pull that creeps worse than trying to load a page on Internet Explorer and a penchant for becoming unreliable when exposed to mildly dirty conditions.

For Sig, slow and steady won the race. For the hot dog gun, well, some jokes are best left as inside jokes.

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