Radio Kul Broadcasts for a Free Syria

The regime has tried to jam their signals

Radio Kul Broadcasts for a Free Syria Radio Kul Broadcasts for a Free Syria
Working in media, it’s hard to imagine watching everything you say for fear the government will come after you. But that’s what it’s like inside Syrian... Radio Kul Broadcasts for a Free Syria

Working in media, it’s hard to imagine watching everything you say for fear the government will come after you. But that’s what it’s like inside Syrian state media, according to Mohamad Al Barodi, who once worked at a regime-controlled news station.

His editors reported to the intelligence services. On T.V., “you can’t deviate from the written text,” he said. “Even mistakes are forbidden.”

Today, Al Barodi works for Radio Kul, an opposition radio station based in Turkey. Meaning “Radio for Everyone,” the staff of independent journalists and editors take an evolutionary — rather than revolutionary — approach to reforming their country.

“We try to reach everybody,” Radio Kul co-founder Obai Sukar said. “We try to speak on behalf of everybody.”

Radio Kul broadcasts online and on the radio via mobile transmitters inside Syria. The regime has tried jamming them. Their reporters have come under fire from snipers and artillery while working in Syria … but Radio Kul is still on the air.

With more than 20 shows, the team broadcasts world news, music, sports, radio plays and comedy sketches — plus highly localized news about the war. They focus on broader themes like the right to vote and protest, medical care, international law and Syrian history and culture.

“We desperately need a free media, because over the past 50 years, we were suffering from the politicalized media by [Assad’s] Ba’ath regime, where they implemented their own thoughts,” news editor Aiman Khalib said.