Extra-Legal Militia Trains on Haitian Mountaintop

Haiti abolished its military in 1995, but don't tell that to the FADH

Extra-Legal Militia Trains on Haitian Mountaintop Extra-Legal Militia Trains on Haitian Mountaintop

Uncategorized October 28, 2015 0

Officially, Haiti has no military. A history of military coups, dictators and severe oppression dating back more than a century led to the armed... Extra-Legal Militia Trains on Haitian Mountaintop

Officially, Haiti has no military. A history of military coups, dictators and severe oppression dating back more than a century led to the armed forces’ disbandment in 1995.

But on a mountaintop outside Port-au-Prince, a group of uniformed men calling themselves the FADH, the French acronym for the Armed Forces of Haiti, drill and train.

“It’s not that the government doesn’t know us,” FADH spokesman Maj. Jean-Fednel Lafalaise told War Is Boring during a trip to the group’s camp. “We’re in the constitution, just like the president. We have a constitutional right to be here.”

The Haitian constitution still provides for a military — there was never an amendment formally abolishing it — but as far as the government is concerned the group calling itself the FADH is an extra-legal militia. Officially, security is the Haitian National Police’s responsibility.

“I believe every time we’re in a situation or there’s some conflict in society, these [groups] come into power and add to the problem,” Haitian National Police spokesman Frantz Lerebours said.

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