China’s Second Aircraft Carrier Sails Closer to Joining the Fleet
China’s first homemade aircraft carrier left her home port of Dalian for her third sea trial on Oct. 28, 2018. The Type 001A flattop could commission into front-line service as early as 2019, according to the U.S. Defense Department — growing Beijing’s carrier force to two and giving China... Read more
China’s New Nuke Subs Might Boost World Stability
China for decades has struggled to develop nuclear ballistic-missile submarines. The country finally might be on the cusp of deploying reliable boomers. An effective Chinese ballistic-missile submarine fleet over the long term could have a stabilizing influence on the world’s nuclear balance. But in the short term, it might... Read more
The U.S. Navy Reveals Two Future Submarine Classes
The U.S. Navy plans to develop two new classes of submarine, according to congressional analysis of the sea service’s shipbuilding plan for 2019. The submarines could help to maintain the Navy’s advantage in submarine-on-submarine warfare while also filling a looming shortfall in the sailing branch’s capacity for sea-to-land missile... Read more
China Wants More Nuclear-Armed Submarines
Tong Zhao is a fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program based at the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. He has written a useful explainer on China’s nuclear arsenal, focusing on the Chinese navy’s growing fleet of ballistic-missile submarines. “For many years, China has mostly relied on land-based nuclear weapons... Read more
Is the U.S. Navy Too Small to Protect Convoys?
The U.S. military’s top sealift officials are worried that, in a war with Russia or China, the U.S. Navy might not have enough warships to escort vital supply convoys from the United States to war zones in Europe or Asia. Those fears might be overblown. Regardless, the Navy is... Read more
U.S. Marine Corps Rocket Batteries Could Become Ship-Killers
The U.S. Marine Corps recently proved that an F-35 stealth fighter can pass targeting data to a ground-based rocket launcher. The test, which took place in Yuma, Arizona sometime prior to mid-October 2018, involved a Marine F-35B detecting a metal container on the ground and passing the GPS coordinates... Read more
Politics Could Scuttle America’s New Icebreakers
The U.S. Coast Guard is on the cusp of finally acquiring new icebreakers, 42 years after commissioning its only current heavy icebreaker. But politically-motivated maneuvers in the U.S. House of Representatives could scuttle the long-in-works shipbuilding effort. As of late 2018 the Coast Guard, which has been responsible for... Read more
For a Brief Inglorious Moment, the U.S. Navy Had a Nuclear-Powered Wetsuit
Originally published on Nov. 26, 2014. You get pretty cold pretty fast when you’re wet. Water absorbs more heat than air—and absorbs it 20 times faster. Without some kind of protection, people can suffer hypothermia even in warm tropical seas. There are several ways to stay warm in the... Read more
His Majesty’s Scary Steam Subs
This story first appeared on Nov. 6, 2015. Like the airplane, the submarine evolved in the early 20th century into a real weapon. But for the British Royal Navy, this posed a dilemma. The Admiralty’s battle plan for its revolutionary new dreadnoughts foresaw high-speed clashes between rival fleets armed with very-long-range... Read more
A Russian Fleet Gathers Near Syria
In late August 2018 Russia launched a naval deployment in the western Mediterranean off the Syrian coast. It was Moscow’s biggest such deployment since the end of the Cold War. The naval moves came shortly after the Kremlin claimed the United States and its Western allies were plotting a... Read more
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