South and Central Asian Air Forces Need Women, Too
There are more and more female military pilot on the Indian subcontinent. Some of the reasons are similar, such as long-running conflicts giving rise to nationalistic and patriotic sentiment, as well as a desire to expand the pool of motivated and well-educated personnel. However, the socio-political context is very... Read more
Asian Air Forces Recruit Women Fighter Pilots
On Aug. 23, 2018, Capt. Misa Matsushima, pictured at top, became the first woman to qualify to fly a jet fighter for the Japanese Air Self Defense Force. Three more women soon followed. Before starting operational service, the 26-year-old Matsushima will practice intercepting intruders with the 305th squadron at... Read more
Hurricane Maria Killed as Many American Citizens as 9/11 Did
On Aug. 28, 2018, the Milken Institute School of Public Health released a study concluding with 95-percent confidence that Hurricane Maria had led to the “excess” deaths of between 2,658 and 3,290 U.S. citizens on the island of Puerto Rico. It so happens that the average figure of 2,975... Read more
A Tsunami Devastated Japan’s Souped-Up F-16s
In the 1980s, Japan phased in its first domestic jet fighter to enter operational service — the Mitsubishi F-1. Tokyo wanted to follow up with a more capable fourth-generation F-2 “support fighter.” It was an ambitious effort. And one that a tsunami nearly destroyed. The Reagan-era Pentagon was worried... Read more
The Forgotten Tale of How Allied Bombers Chased a German Sub to Its Doom
In June 2018, Spanish media reported that divers Anxi González Roca and Eduardo Losada and naval historian Yago Abilleira had re-discovered the wreck Nazi submarine U-966 off Estaca de Bares in the Galician region on the northwestern tip of Spain. The divers found debris scattered across a wide area... Read more
The First U.K. Hit-Job
On July 8, 2018, 44-year-old English woman Dawn Sturgess died at Salisbury District Hospital in the United Kingdom following her exposure to a Novichok nerve agent. Sturgess and her partner Charlie Rowley had sprayed themselves with the agent of what appeared to be a bottle of brand-name perfume they... Read more
How a Lone Polish Cadet Rampaged Through German Panzers
We tend to impose narratives on history, seizing on compelling legends and streamlining complex events into a convenient and rousing story. Thus first act of World War II is often told as a story of Polish cavalry, lances in hand, charging unstoppable Nazi tanks. However, one Polish cadet and... Read more
In 1918, British and German Tanks Clashed at Villers-Bretonneux
One hundred years ago, on the evening of April 23, 1918, a thousand German artillery pieces unleashed high-explosive shells and mustard gas around the French town of Villers-Bretonneux. Imperial Germany had launching a last-ditch Spring Offensive in the sector around Amiens in an attempt to defeat French and British... Read more
In 1971, the U.S. Navy Almost Fought the Soviets Over Bangladesh
This story originally appeared on July 19, 2016. In 2016, the United States backed India’s application to join the Nuclear Suppliers Group — but didn’t support Pakistan’s. This marked an extraordinary turning point in the United States’ relationship with these historical adversaries. In 1971, the United States sent part of its... Read more
Why Is the Trump Administration Selling Giant Sniper Rifles to Ukraine?
On Dec. 20, 2017, the U.S. State Department publicly announced it was finally issuing an export license for Ukraine to purchase lethal military weapons. Pres. Donald Trump personally approved the move after Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Defense Secretary James Mattis briefed him. Curiously, the only specific form... Read more
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