The Death of the Spanish Blue Division
On the frigid morning of Feb. 10, 1943, the 5,900 soldiers of the 250th “Blue” Infantry Division — Spanish volunteers fighting for the Axis on the Eastern Front of World War II — were sitting in their trenches and dugouts when the high-explosive shells fired from hundreds of Soviet... Read more
The UAE Is Getting Ready to Deploy Jets to the Libya War
New satellite imagery from Terra Server — dated Sept. 24 and Nov. 10, 2017 — show accelerating construction on Al Khadim air base in eastern Libya. And that’s strong evidence that the United Arab Emirates is preparing to intervene even more in the grinding Libyan civil war. The imagery... Read more
U.S. Special Operations Forces Deployed to 149 Countries in 2017
“We don’t know exactly where we’re at in the world, militarily, and what we’re doing,” Sen. Lindsey Graham, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said in October 2017. That was in the wake of the combat deaths of four members of the Special Operations forces in the West... Read more
The Cheetah Was South Africa’s ‘Good Enough’ Fighter
Draken International, a Florida-based company which bills itself as the world’s largest private air force, will buy 12 Atlas Cheetah jet fighters from the South African arms company Denel. The addition of the Cheetah will add another warplane type to Draken’s inventory, and could soon see action in mock... Read more
In a Second Korean War, U.S. Troops Will Fight Underground
U.S. Army war planners and weapons developers have been increasing efforts to fast-track networking technologies for soldiers operating underground in tunnel complexes and in dense urban environments. While the Army created entities such as its Rapid Equipping Force to address fast-emerging threats, the prospect of major ground war on... Read more
In 1964, the U.S. Treasury Seized a Virtual Museum of Machine Guns
In June 1964, agents of the U.S. Treasury Department staged a seven-day sting targeting what news reports described as a “mysterious warehouse” in Ridgefield, New Jersey. What they discovered was startling. 517 guns. A few quite interesting. And some … illegal. A photograph in the New York Journal-American newspaper... Read more
Russia’s Sniper Rifles Have Gotten Better at Punching Through Body Armor
The Russian involvement in Syria and Ukraine has provided a wealth of experience to the Russian military. One of the hallmarks of these engagements is the continued use of sniper tactics. As a result, the modern Russian sniper has evolved far beyond the relatively primitive technology used during the... Read more
After the AK-47, Mikhail Kalashnikov Pushed an Automatic Pistol
In the late 1940s, Mikhail Kalashnikov — the Russian gun-designer behind the then-new AK-47 assault rifle — produced an automatic handgun called the APK. Busy completing the AK-47, Kalashnikov reportedly lacked the time to truly refine the APK. In the end, the Red Army preferred Igor Stechkin’s own APS... Read more
Zapping North Korean Nukes With Microwave Weapons Is a Terrible Idea
One of the options that the United States is looking at to counter North Korea’s nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles is an experimental weapon called CHAMP. CHAMP stands for Counter-Electronics High-Powered Microwave Advanced Missile Project. It uses bursts of microwave energy — an electromagnetic pulse — to disable electronic systems. The idea would... Read more
The PPsH-41 Submachine Gun Makes Me Want to Shout ‘Uraah!’
The PPsH-41 submachine gun undoubtedly reigns as an icon of the Soviet war machine in World War II, immortalized in combat photographs and in films such as Cross of Iron and The Tin Drum.  Like the T-34 tank and the Il-2 Shturmovik attack plane, the “Pepsha” or “Papasha” (“Daddy”) was not only a... Read more