An Egyptian Copy of a Swedish Gun Became an Assassin’s Weapon

A clone of the Swedish K killed Anwar Sadat

An Egyptian Copy of a Swedish Gun Became an Assassin’s Weapon An Egyptian Copy of a Swedish Gun Became an Assassin’s Weapon
In the early 1950s the Egyptian government acquired the production license and manufacturing equipment and plans for the Swedish m/45 submachine gun — the... An Egyptian Copy of a Swedish Gun Became an Assassin’s Weapon

In the early 1950s the Egyptian government acquired the production license and manufacturing equipment and plans for the Swedish m/45 submachine gun — the “Swedish K.” The state-owned Carl Gustaf factory had developed the m/45, a blowback submachine gun chambered in nine-by-19-millimeter, in 1944 and ’45.

The Egyptian ministry of military production directed the Al Maadi Company for Engineering Industries — a.k.a. Factory 54 — to produce the new submachine guns. The first production variant was a direct copy of the Carl Gustav m/45 designated the “Port Said.”

Cairo issued the Port Said to officers, support troops and vehicle-mounted troops. It saw action for the first time during the 1956 Suez Crisis. Egyptian troops carried the Port Said during the North Yemen Civil War between 1962 and 1967. It also played a major role in the 1967 Six-Day War with Israel and the Yom Kippur War in 1973.

Egyptian soldiers armed with Port Saids cross the Suez Canal in 1973. Source

During these two conflicts, Egyptian troops armed with Port Saids faced Israelis carrying the Uzi, another of the period’s iconic submachine guns.

In the 1970s the Egyptian army adopted a simplified variant, the “Akaba.” Compared to the earlier guns, the Akaba typically had much rougher fit, finish and markings. Both variants had the early m/45’s removable magazine housing, allowing them to feed from either 50-round or 36-round box magazines.

However, unlike the Port Said — which had flip-up rear sights for 100 meters and 200 meters — the Akaba had a fixed, 100-meter rear aperture sight. It also featured a telescoping wire stock similar to that on the French MAT-49 and U.S. M3.

Assassins gun down Anwar Sadat. Source

The Akaba also dispensed with the Port Said’s perforated barrel shroud and shortened the barrel from 212 millimeters to 150 millimeters, slightly reducing the weapon’s weight.

In October 1981, Egyptian army officers and members of the Islamic Jihad group used a Port Said, along with numerous AK-47s, to assassinate Egypt’s president Anwar Sadat. The assassination took place during the annual victory parade celebrating Egypt’s successful crossing of the Suez Canal during the the Yom Kippur War.

Lt. Khalid Islambouli and his team of assassins jumped out of one of the army’s parading vehicles and opened fire on the presidential viewing stand. Sadat and 10 other dignitaries died. Twenty-eight more were wounded, some mortally.

This story originally appeared at Historical Firearms.


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