Russia’s Intervention in Syria Is a Sign of Weakness

The Kremlin has a broken logistical infrastructure and not enough troops

Russia’s Intervention in Syria Is a Sign of Weakness Russia’s Intervention in Syria Is a Sign of Weakness
After four years, the Syrian Civil War has killed more than 200,000 people and displaced millions more. Now, Russia’s military has intervened in attempt... Russia’s Intervention in Syria Is a Sign of Weakness

After four years, the Syrian Civil War has killed more than 200,000 people and displaced millions more. Now, Russia’s military has intervened in attempt to prop up embattled Syrian Pres. Bashar Al Assad.

To some in the West, Putin’s intervention is a comment on the failure of America and her allies to take control of a horrific situation. These pundits view Putin as a strong man, playing a complicated game of chess against the West … and winning.

Worse, with so many different countries, sects and factions fighting in Syria it’s easy to see how one wrong missile could spark a greater conflict. Turkey — a longtime NATO member — has balked at recent Russian incursions into its airspace.

The annexation of Crimea, the war in Eastern Ukraine and the military actions in Syria present the image of a confident Putin willing to expend military power for political gain. But the truth, according to Russia security expert Mark Galeotti of New York University, is far more complex.

The Russian president faces political and economic difficulties at home and Russia’s military is not as powerful as it seems. “Putin does not have significant numbers of the kind of troops you can deploy in this kind of environment,” Galeotti explained to War College.

The revelations continue as Galeotti paints a picture of the Kremlin that’s just trying to get the West to play ball — not trying to start World War III. For Galeotti, Russia’s adventure in Syria is business as usual.

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