American Police Are Acting Like Military Occupiers
Four people arrested at an inauguration protest in Washington, D.C. on Jan. 20, 2017 are suing the city’s Metropolitan Police Department for using rape and molestation as a form of punishment. Photojournalist Shay Horse, volunteer legal-observer Judah Ariel and protesters Elizabeth Lagesse and Milo Gonzalez allege they were assaulted... Read more
White Phosphorous Isn’t Helping America Win in Syria
In mid-June 2017, rights groups reported that the U.S.-led coalition had used white phosphorus in Mosul and Raqqa as part of its campaign against Islamic State. The use of such a controversial weapon speaks to a wider and more disturbing problem. Warfare is becoming increasingly urban in nature and,... Read more
It’s Not Just ‘Strangelove’ —Today’s Bombers Rely on America’s Weakest Nuclear Links
This story originally appeared on Feb. 23, 2017. It’s the second article in a three-part series on how limited foreign attacks could endanger America’s fragile command and control over nuclear weapons. Reads parts one and three. The original screenplay for the 1964 classic film Dr. Strangelove includes a scene in... Read more
‘Super-Fuzed’ Warheads on U.S. Navy Subs Risk Sparking an Accidental Nuclear War
This story originally appeared on March 10, 2017. On March 1, 2017, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists released a major scoop that has extremely worrisome implications for U.S.-Russian relations and the risk of nuclear war. The story, by Hans Kristensen, Matthew McKinzie and Theodore Postol, concerns a new... Read more
To Many Americans, War Doesn’t Seem Real
There are so many wars and rumors of war involving the United States these days that it starts to feel a little unreal, even for the most devoted of news watchers. And for many Americans, it’s long been that way. For them, the meaning of war is closer to... Read more
How Putin Might Yank Away Trump’s Control Over America’s Nuclear Weapons
This story originally appeared on Feb. 21, 2017. It’s the first article in a three-part series on how limited enemy attacks could endanger America’s fragile command and control over nuclear weapons. Read parts two and three. It’s what puts the “love” in Dr. Strangelove. Air Force pilot Maj. “King” Kong,... Read more
Is the Arctic the Next Superpower Battleground?
The harsh, sparsely populated Arctic is warming and sea ice is falling, which means governments are looking north for both economic ventures and as an arena of strategic competition. This goes even more so for the Kremlin. Russia has the longest Arctic border in the world, and its oil and gas... Read more
Oliver Stone Defines Useful Idiot in ‘The Putin Interviews’
Russian Pres. Vladimir Putin is a charmer, and after four hours of Oliver Stone’s softball questions he drew me in. Here was a world leader with the calm, intelligence and presence of mind lacking in so many other leaders these days. To here Putin tell it, he cares about... Read more
The Roots of American Political Violence
Antifa and white nationalists clash in the streets. Students armed with bats on a college campus patrol the sidewalks. A man in Portland stabs several people on a bus, and another in Virginia opens fire on Republican legislators on a baseball field. This week on War College, Joe Young—an... Read more
Stopping Gangs Means Talking to Gang Members
Chicago’s gang problem is different in many ways from a full-scale counterinsurgency campaign, such as the one the United States fought against Iraqi insurgents from 2003 to 2011. Although Chicago’s 786 homicides in 2016 would make the city the 13th deadliest global armed conflict, Chicago’s gang members rarely directly... Read more
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