Everything Went Wrong for the Axis During Operation Bagration
The Soviet army’s Operation Bagration offensive in June 1944 destroyed their greatest nemesis — Nazi Germany’s Army Group Center — and drove hundreds of thousands of Soviet troops and thousands of tanks from east of Minsk into the Third Reich itself. It was, arguably, the greatest disaster for Germany... Read more
The Long History of Korea’s Missile Program
It’s said history doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes. In the late 14th century, Korea’s ruling Joseon dynasty began an all-out espionage campaign to acquire classified missile technology from neighboring China. At the time, stateless wokou “dwarf pirates”—so called because of their comparatively shorter stature—were ravaging the Korean... Read more
Un criador de pollos español, una apostadora peruana y un mujeriego serbio le tomaron el pelo a Adolf Hitler
Nadie se cree que los espías disfruten en la realidad de estilos de vida glamurosos tipo James Bond con trajes a medida, vestidos ajustados, sexo y apuestas. Así que, uno de los placeres de leer el libro Double Cross: The True Story of the D-Day Spies [Double Cross: La... Read more
The Death of the Spanish Blue Division
On the frigid morning of Feb. 10, 1943, the 5,900 soldiers of the 250th “Blue” Infantry Division — Spanish volunteers fighting for the Axis on the Eastern Front of World War II — were sitting in their trenches and dugouts when the high-explosive shells fired from hundreds of Soviet... Read more
In 1964, the U.S. Treasury Seized a Virtual Museum of Machine Guns
In June 1964, agents of the U.S. Treasury Department staged a seven-day sting targeting what news reports described as a “mysterious warehouse” in Ridgefield, New Jersey. What they discovered was startling. 517 guns. A few quite interesting. And some … illegal. A photograph in the New York Journal-American newspaper... Read more
After the AK-47, Mikhail Kalashnikov Pushed an Automatic Pistol
In the late 1940s, Mikhail Kalashnikov — the Russian gun-designer behind the then-new AK-47 assault rifle — produced an automatic handgun called the APK. Busy completing the AK-47, Kalashnikov reportedly lacked the time to truly refine the APK. In the end, the Red Army preferred Igor Stechkin’s own APS... Read more
The PPsH-41 Submachine Gun Makes Me Want to Shout ‘Uraah!’
The PPsH-41 submachine gun undoubtedly reigns as an icon of the Soviet war machine in World War II, immortalized in combat photographs and in films such as Cross of Iron and The Tin Drum.  Like the T-34 tank and the Il-2 Shturmovik attack plane, the “Pepsha” or “Papasha” (“Daddy”) was not only a... Read more
The General Who Could Have Replaced George Washington
Queries the great Sheldon Cooper: “How would the Civil War have gone differently if Lincoln had been a robot sent from the future?” None can tell. But we can essay some critical analysis about how the revolution would have gone had the Patriots rejected Washington as commander-in-chief and embraced the alternative... Read more
A Spanish Chicken Farmer, a Peruvian Gambler and Serbian Playboy Fooled Adolf Hitler
No one really expects spies to live glamorous James Bond-lifestyles full of tailored suits, tight dresses, sex and gambling. So, one of the pleasures of reading Ben Macintyre’s Double Cross: The True Story of the D-Day Spies is learning about a half-dozen outrageous secret agents who really did lead... Read more
How South Africa Voluntarily Gave Up Its Nuclear Weapons
The Republic of South Africa is the only country in the world to build a nuclear weapons program, then unbuild that program after domestic and international conditions changed. Why did South Africa decide to build nukes, how did it build them and why did it decide to give them... Read more
  • 100% ad free experience
  • Get our best stories sent to your inbox every day
  • Membership to private Facebook group
Show your support for continued hard hitting content.
Only $19.99 per year!
Become a War is Boring subscriber