Source The L-39 weighed 109 pounds by MATTHEW MOSS The mammoth Lahti L-39 anti-tank rifle, designed by Aimo Lahti — Finland’s greatest gun-designer — served Finland well during the 1940s. The 20-millimeter, semi-automatic anti-tank rifle’s barrel alone was 51.2 inches long, and the overall weapon weighed a staggering 109 pounds. Through the 1930s, the Finnish military... Read more
B-17s unload over Germany in March 1945. U.S. Air Force photo Bombers blasted the Hell out of Pantelleria by JAMES STEVENSON In the years after World War I, the brain trust of the U.S. Army evolved two conflicting opinions on how best to apply air power in the next war. The... Read more
Jeep del SAS en Alemania en 1944. Foto del Ejército británico La operación militar realizada en 1944 demostró la importancia de las operaciones especiales por ROBERT BECKHUSEN La invasión en 1944 de la Francia ocupada por los alemanes por parte de los Aliados Occidentales comenzó con el mayor asalto... Read more
Rebuilt U.S. Army ammunition gave pilots extra firepower, fast by JOSEPH TREVITHICK In October 1970, American AC-119G Shadow gunships headed out to strike communist insurgents in South Vietnam and Cambodia. This time, the portly aircraft had a surprise — fast-firing miniguns loaded with specially-made incendiary bullets. More than a year earlier,... Read more
Drip rifle Troops rigged weapons to fire on their own by MATTHEW MOSS On Jan. 9, 1916, the disastrous Gallipoli campaign came to an end with the successful evacuation of the surviving Allied troops. The campaign had begun on April 15, 1915 and lasted eight months with no real gains for... Read more
An LK II at the German Tank Museum in Munster. Huhu photo via Wikimedia Joseph Vollmer’s LK II wasn’t very good, but still a better idea than the A7V by ROBERT BECKHUSEN When the German army’s first domestically-built tanks rolled into combat in March 1918 at St. Quentin Canal, the... Read more
An SAS jeep in Germany in 1944. British Army photo 1944 operation proved the value of special operations by ROBERT BECKHUSEN The Western Allies’ invasion of German-occupied France in 1944 began with the largest seaborne assault ever and inflicted chaos on Hitler’s troops. Within weeks, the Allied armies would break... Read more
Meeting of the victors at the Versailles Peace Conference of 1919. Guess who didn’t get invited? Painting by William Opren Diplomatic dysfunction can cause countries to remain at war for decades or longer by SÉBASTIEN ROBLIN A declaration of war is usually a pretty serious matter. Sometimes, however, it’s just for... Read more
Soviet armored ski sleds. Finnish Defense Forces photos Overloaded defenses sank into the snow by DAVID AXE It’s no secret that the Soviet army was badly prepared to fight Finnish forces in late 1939 and early 1940, during the brief, bloody and — for the Soviets — catastrophic Russo-Finnish Winter War. One particularly ill-conceived weapon underscores just... Read more
These men shot other men. Imperial War Museum photo The raid on Tamet was merciless by ROBERT BECKHUSEN Britain’s legendary Special Air Service stumbled into a disaster on its first mission in November 1941 during Operation Crusader, which repelled the Axis from besieged Tobruk. Twenty-two of 55 SAS commandos died... Read more
  • 100% ad free experience
  • Get our best stories sent to your inbox every day
  • Membership to private Facebook group
Show your support for continued hard hitting content.
Only $19.99 per year!
Become a War is Boring subscriber