Sevastopol’s Soviet Defenders Helped Save Stalingrad
Seventy-five years ago this month, the German army began its final assault on Sevastopol, the port city on the Crimean peninsula which the Third Reich had besieged from fall 1941. While overshadowed—at least in the West—by larger and more significant battles on the Eastern Front, the Soviet defense of the... Read more
Hubris Led to the Japanese Carrier Fleet’s Doom at Midway
A devil’s advocate is a precious commodity. That has to be one of the takeaways from revisiting the Battle of Midway 75 years on, and it should be etched on the internal workings of any martial institution that wants to survive and thrive amid the rigors, danger and sheer orneriness... Read more
The DOE Colt Was for Nuke-Plant Guards
Often described as the “DOE Colt,” after a 1980s U.S. Department of Energy contract for submachine guns, the R0633 is a nine-by-19-millimeter submachine gun based on the M-16. Colt employees referred to the R0633 as a “briefcase gun.” The DOE Colt is select-fire, with a three-position selector switch. It’s... Read more
Shot Down in a Hail of Flak in an A-20 Bomber
Hurtling headlong into a vertical hail of razor-sharp shrapnel from the constant drum of enemy ack-ack, the Douglas A-20G light bomber crew wrestles the flight controls as their aircraft bucks wildly on turbulent eruptions of rising hot air at impossibly low altitude. It’s Oct. 16, 1944 over Bologna, Italy.... Read more
Nobody Wanted the Super-Short M-16K
Tim La France’s company La France Specialties developed the M-16K in the early 1980s. This carbine had a 21-centimeter-long barrel and an overall length of 60 centimeters with its stock collapsed. La France meant the extremely compact M16K “for situations where a full-power rifle is desirable, but a smaller... Read more
Savage Couldn’t Beat Colt’s M1911
Even though it lost out to Colt’s M1911, the Savage Model 1907 was undoubtedly one of the finest commercial pistols of its day — well-designed, finely-manufactured and revolutionary in many respects. In the early 1900s, Elbert Searle of Philadelphia began working on a series of semi-automatic pistol designs. He... Read more
Iraq’s Close Encounters With Stealth Fighters
In mid-December 1990, an Iraqi Airways Boeing 747 took off for a flight from Kuwait International — then occupied by Iraqi troops — to Baghdad. The aircraft was piloted by Captain Remzi, former fighter pilot with a long career flying Sukhoi Su-7BMKs and Su-20s during the war with Iran.... Read more
The Gun That Started World War I
Gavrilo Princip’s killing of Austria-Hungary’s archduke Franz Ferdinand is perhaps one of history’s best known assassinations. It catalysed the political, bureaucratic and martial wranglings that led to World War I. The gun Princip used to kill Ferdinand — an FN-Browning M1910 — is therefore one of history’s most significant... Read more
Aimo Johannes Lahti Personally Rearmed Finland
Between 1922 and 1940, Aimo Johannes Lahti designed some of Finland’s best small arms, including pistols, submachine guns, machine guns and anti-tank guns. Until the end of World War I, Finland had been an autonomous Grand Duchy of the Russian Empire and, as such, relied on Russian small arms. The Mosin-Nagant... Read more
As World War I Loomed, the British Army Finally Took Its Machine Guns Off Carriages
In the photograph above, the machine-gun section of the 8th Royal Scots (The Royal Regiment) poses with its machine guns. In that photograph, the Machine Gun, Maxim, Mk.I is mounted on a carriage while, in the photo below, it’s on a tripod and deployed in a trench during a field... Read more
  • 100% ad free experience
  • Get our best stories sent to your inbox every day
  • Membership to private Facebook group
Show your support for continued hard hitting content.
Priced at $19.99 per year, the first 200 people to sign up will receive a free War is Boring T-Shirt.
Become a War is Boring subscriber