When to Shoot a Nuclear Bomb With Your Gun
This story originally appeared on Jan. 30, 2015. The year is 1960 and a congressional delegation is touring military bases in Western Europe to evaluate custody and safety issues associated with U.S. nuclear weapons. With the delegation is a scientist named Harold Agnew—and he’s not just another congressional staffer.... Read more
El fusil Baker convirtió a los soldados en letales tiradores a larga distancia
Un gélido día de enero de 1809, Thomas Plunkett ─ fusilero del 95º Regimiento de Fusiles británico ─ se encontraba fuera de la ciudad española de Cacabelos tumbado en el suelo con la espalda sobre la nieve. Cualquiera diría que no era lugar para un irlandés, pero... Read more
The Baker Rifle Transformed Soldiers Into Long-Distance Killers
Originally published on June 16, 2015. On a freezing January day in 1809, rifleman Thomas Plunkett of the British 95th Rifles was flat on his back in the snow outside of the Spanish town of Cacabelos. Some might say that was no place for an Irishman, but this was... Read more
Viet Cong Commandos Sank an American Aircraft Carrier
It was shortly after midnight when two Viet Cong commandos emerged from a sewer tunnel that emptied into Saigon Port, each man carrying nearly 90 pounds of high explosives and the components needed to make two time bombs. Their target was the largest American ship in port, USNS Card.... Read more
The ‘Tsar Bomba’ Was a 50-Megaton Monster Nuke
Maj. Andrei Durnovtsev, a Soviet air force pilot and commander of a Tu-95 Bear bomber, holds a dubious honor in the history of the Cold War. Durnovtsev flew the aircraft that dropped the most powerful nuclear bomb ever. It had an explosive force of 50 megatons, or more than... Read more
How a Hipster City Planned to Survive Nuclear Armageddon
Think of the city of Portland, Ore., today and it’s easy to conjure images of hipsters living the earth-friendly and artsy Pacific Northwest lifestyle — a laid-back place where a vegan donut is the most popular pastry and according to a character from the T.V. show Portlandia, you can... Read more
The Lewis Gun Was a New Kind of Killing Machine
It must be an automatic rifle, Robert Jordan thought. “How much does it weigh?” he asked. “One man can carry it, but it is heavy. It has three legs that fold. We got it in the last serious raid. The one before the wine.” “How many rounds have you... Read more
The Hs 129 Was Supposed to Be the A-10 of World War II
La ametralladora DP se ve rara, pero derramó mucha sangre
Desde 1928 se ha podido ver en los campos de batalla de todo el mundo un arma de la era soviética muy curiosa que confirma la veracidad del antiguo dicho “las apariencias engañan.” Una vez se la apodó “el fonógrafo de Stalin” y la melodía que toca es el... Read more
Little Armenia Could Play a Big Role if Russia and Turkey Ever Go to War
It’s no secret that the relationship between Russia and Turkey is dismal, with the countries clashing over their respective roles in the Syrian civil war. Russia backs the Syrian regime. Turkey backs the regime’s opponents. What is less-known is a little country that has huge geopolitical significance and a... Read more

Paul Richard Huard

Contributing Writer

Military historian, free-lance journalist, and contributor to War Is Boring. Areas of expertise: American military history, the Cold War, Russia and the Soviet Union, military small arms.

  • 100% ad free experience
  • Get our best stories sent to your inbox every day
  • Membership to private Facebook group
Show your support for continued hard hitting content.
Only $19.99 per year!
Become a War is Boring subscriber