Aimo Johannes Lahti Personally Rearmed Finland
Between 1922 and 1940, Aimo Johannes Lahti designed some of Finland’s best small arms, including pistols, submachine guns, machine guns and anti-tank guns. Until the end of World War I, Finland had been an autonomous Grand Duchy of the Russian Empire and, as such, relied on Russian small arms. The Mosin-Nagant... Read more
As World War I Loomed, the British Army Finally Took Its Machine Guns Off Carriages
In the photograph above, the machine-gun section of the 8th Royal Scots (The Royal Regiment) poses with its machine guns. In that photograph, the Machine Gun, Maxim, Mk.I is mounted on a carriage while, in the photo below, it’s on a tripod and deployed in a trench during a field... Read more
An Egyptian Copy of a Swedish Gun Became an Assassin’s Weapon
In the early 1950s the Egyptian government acquired the production license and manufacturing equipment and plans for the Swedish m/45 submachine gun — the “Swedish K.” The state-owned Carl Gustaf factory had developed the m/45, a blowback submachine gun chambered in nine-by-19-millimeter, in 1944 and ’45. The Egyptian ministry... Read more
La ametralladora MG3 de Alemania resulta insustituible
Alemania Occidental se convirtió en miembro de la OTAN en mayo de 1955. Seis meses después su ejército se convirtió en la Bundeswehr (Fuerza de Defensa Federal de Alemania). A finales de los años 1950 y principios de los años 1960, la Bundeswehr inició un importante programa de rearme.... Read more
Evolution of the Landship
At the outset of World War I, the British Army possessed a motley collection of motor vehicles including staff cars, trucks and a handful of artillery tractors. The early fighting on the Western Front compelled the British to hastily deploy rudimentary armored cars. And as the front lines became... Read more
This Snag-Proof Pistol Never Caught On
In September 1918, inventor John Morrison of Spokane, Washington patented a simple adaptation for sidearms that ostensibly made them snag-proof. The modification also elongated a weapon’s sight radius. Morrison’s patent claimed to “provide a pistol embodying a simple and inexpensive appartenance designed and adapted to provide a considerable distance between the... Read more
A Medieval Knight Was Surprisingly Nimble
It’s a popular misconception that a medieval knight, once knocked off his mount, could barely move and was thus vulnerable to more fleet-footed light infantry. An October 2016 exhibition at the Swiss Military Museum at the Castle of Morges helped to disprove this myth. The museum organized a race... Read more
Colt’s Underslung Grenade Launcher Was Too Complex
Since the 17th century, infantry have tried to shoot grenades from their firearms. Until the 1960s, this almost always meant some kind of muzzle attachment or a grenade that could be fired from the end of a rifle’s barrel. In May 1963, the U.S. military called for a new... Read more
Germany’s MG3 Machine Gun Is Irreplaceable
West Germany became a member of NATO in May 1955. Six months later its army reformed as the Bundeswehr. In the late 1950s and early ’60s, the Bundeswehr launched a major rearmament program. Despite adopting a wide range of new weapons, the Bundeswehr continued to use the 7.92-by-57-millimeter MG42... Read more
The French MAS-38 Was Weird But Well-Designed
In the early 1930s, France’s Manufacture d’Armes de Saint-Étienne developed the Pistolet Mitrailleur MAS Modèle 38 in a response to the French military’s call for new submachine gun. The French tested the weapon, selected it in 1938 and launched production in 1939, just months before the beginning of World... Read more
  • 100% ad free experience
  • Get our best stories sent to your inbox every day
  • Membership to private Facebook group
Show your support for continued hard hitting content.
Priced at $19.99 per year, the first 200 people to sign up will receive a free War is Boring T-Shirt.
Become a War is Boring subscriber