The Kurds Are Holding the Line in Iraq
There was panic in June when militants from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria captured Mosul, Iraq’s second largest city. Thousands of civilians fled as the Sunni militants set about destroying Shia and Christian religious sites. Hamdaniya is a 10-minute car trip east of Mosul. Its residents—including many... Read more
The ‘Peshmerga’ Are Those Who Face Death
When Islamic militants attacked and Iraqi troops abandoned many towns in the country’s north, the semi-autonomus Kurdish region dispatched its peshmerga militia to hold the line. The pesh fighters raced to Khanaqin, a city near oil-rich Kirkuk. Many refugees fleeing the fighting have found shelter in and around Khanaqin.... Read more
ISIS Used Fuel Supplies as a Weapon
Last week militants from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria captured—at least for a while—a vital oil refinery in the town of Baiji in northern Iraq. The Islamists promptly cut off fuel supplies to the rest of Iraq, including Kurdistan. The Iraqi army claims it has retaken Baiji.... Read more
How One Kurdish Village Took in Scores of Iraqi Refugees
Adnan Mohammed Ali is a member of the Kurdish Kakaye tribe … and a man of influence. He’s the mukhtar—secular leader—of Bahari Taza, a small Kurdish village near the Iraqi town of Khanaqin. And to hundreds of refuge families, Ali is a hero. Bahari Taza is 20 minutes by road... Read more
This Is What It’s Like to Be a Refugee in Northern Iraq
The Kurds know what it’s like to be displaced. Thirty million strong, they’re the largest ethnic group in the world without a country of their own. So it’s not without irony that the semi-autonomous Kurdistan region of Iraq—the safest zone in the country owing to the Kurds’ fearsome peshmerga... Read more

Matt Cetti-Roberts

Photojournalist, documentary photographer and correspondent in Iraqi-Kurdistan

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